In his years as a cartoonist and children’s writer, Dr. Seuss (whose real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel), created some of the world’s most famous books and illustrations, including Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat and The Lorax. But what really makes the work of Dr. Seuss noteworthy, are the valuable life lessons that can be found throughout his writing.

Check out these 10 important and inspiring life lessons as told by Dr. Seuss himself:

  1. Today you are you, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is youer than you.
  2. A person’s a person, no matter how small.
  3. The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.
  4. Think left and think right and think low and think high, oh, the thinks you can think up if you only think.
  5. Step with care and great tact, and remember that life’s a great balancing act.
  6. Fun is good.
  7. Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.
  8. You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And you are the guy who’ll decide where to go.
  9. You oughta be thankful, a whole heaping lot. For the people and places, you’re lucky you’re not.
  10. Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not.

Not only is there a lot we can learn from Dr. Seuss and his stories, but his books are a great tool in teaching your child how to read. When reading these books with your child, discuss the deeper meaning behind these fun-filled rhymes and stories. There’s a lot more to take from these books than just good fun! Find out how Dr. Seuss can help your early reader in our latest Grammy Tammy blog!

Topics: children, Learning, Dr. Seuss, reading

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